Another Blog About Strength in Weightlifting!

maxresdefault-2Most lifters know that while you are on a high volume squatting or strength phase your snatch and clean and jerk are likely to go down temporarily.  Of course when you recover from the intense strength work your lifts usually take a jump and more than recover any lost ground.

While practice on the snatch and clean and jerk is important,  don’t forget that strength increases are the real driver of long term progress in weightlifting.  The competitive lifts are often talked about in terms of their relationship with the squat, and it is safe to say that no one will ever snatch or clean and jerk more than they squat.  Both competitive lifts will always be a PERCENTAGE of your squat, and that percentage will never be equal to or greater than 100%.  Usually about 65% for the snatch and 85% for the clean and jerk are thought of as the maximal efficiency that a lifter can achieve.

As your strength increases, so does your POTENTIAL for a big total in weightlifting.  But the temporary decrease numbers for the competitive lifts while you are on an intense strength cycle seems to make some coaches shy away from programming a lot of strength work.  You see this most often in online programs like Train Heroic.  While some of t he weightlifting programs (like the california strength programs) are great, there are some have a real lack of strength training to go along with the technical work.  While this is a great way to drive progress for a short time, for the long term it falls short.

If you are following an online program, ask yourself what percentage of the work is geared to strength development, and what percent  is geared towards technical improvement?  A good way to quantify this is to look at the amount of time you spend on the snatch and clean and jerk vs. the amount of time you spend on squatting and other strength work.  If you are spending an hour training the snatch and clean and jerk, then only half that long doing strength work then there is something wrong.

A  good rule of thumb is that during most phases of training you should spend AT LEAST as much time on squatting and other strength exercises as you do practicing the snatch and clean and jerk and other related lifts.  Make sure the coach who is writing your programming is not sacrificing long term progress for short term gains.

If the program you are on is only geared toward technique and gives the acquisition of strength the short end of the stick, then take a hike and find another program.  There are plenty of good programs out there!

 

 

 

 

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